Photography On Location

Miami Speedlight Class

August 28th, 2015

PP1015-MS-Miami-FINALa
I have been getting a lot of questions about when I might be teaching another speedlight class, so here it is. The Popular Photography Mentor Series is running a speedlight workshop in Miami in February, and it will be a great event. I’m thrilled to be working with Dave Tejada, he is a wizard with speedlights and a terrific teacher. Miami is loaded with colorful photography options, and we will explore a wide variety of venues on the trip. If you are looking for a nice sunny few days learning speedlights, come join me in Miami.

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Think graphically

August 26th, 2015

Alaska
I regularly teach composition classes on photography workshops. I have changed my class frequently through the years, trying to create the perfect composition class that gives students tangible creative techniques to try. But one thing has never changed in my presentation; ‘think graphically, not literally.’ Or as Monet said, “In order to see you must forget the name of everything. By labeling, we recognize everything, but on longer see anything.”

This was the case with this Dall Porpoise in Kenai Fjords NP, Alaska. This pod of porpoise surfed in our bow wake for 20 minutes, it was an incredible experience. I started photographing the action with the end goal of getting a porpoise above the water or maybe its dorsal fin. But then I realized just their shapes and the splash patterns were creating amazing, graphic images. I became less focused on photographing the porpoise, and more interesting in capturing the design and shape created by this event. After shooting hundreds of images, I found one image I liked, posted above. The strength of the image is it’s graphical qualities, not what animal is in the photograph.

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Enlarging your photo

August 16th, 2015

cubby
‘Res up’ or resizing your image is something most photographers will want to do at some point. I shoot a lot of wildlife images with my Nikon D4, a 16MP camera, and if I want to make a large print to hang on my wall, I may need to enlarge the image. Or maybe you run into this scenario. I just returned from photographing bears in Alaska, and one of my favorite shots was a cub resting her head on another cub. The cubs were about 150 feet away, and even with a 400mm and the 36MP D810, the bears just weren’t large enough in the final shot. I cropped down to the bear cubs and was left with a small file. What to do?

Anyone remember Genuine Fractals? This was the method to use to enlarge images, and it has been around a long time. Now this program is included in the onOne Perfect Photo Suite as Perfect Resize 9.5. And honestly, if you are buying Resize, you should look at buying the entire suite. I’ll look at other programs in this bundle later, but they are all really good.

gf
Here is the screenshot of the Resize window. You can see the action chosen is Genuine Fractals, and you have much more control than in early versions. For those who want an instant result, just choose the document size and hit the ‘apply’ button, you will get a terrific enlarged image. You also have numerous other controls including sharpening and grain. If you need a little more file size for that 17×22″ inkjet print, try out Perfect Resize. They offer a free 30 day trial, or buy the entire suite for $99.95.

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Contrast is good.

August 1st, 2015

gtrains
I was photographing rock climbing yesterday, and by the time we got to the route I wanted to photograph, it was midday. With a cloudless sky and intense sun, this is a time most photographers would kick back and wait for better light. But what if the ‘better light’ is in the middle of a sunny day? ‘No matter what the conditions and lighting, something will photograph well’. Assignment photographers know you don’t have the luxury of putting your camera away in the middle of the day because the sun is strong. You may only have one day to photograph a location. So you seek out subjects and locations that photograph well with the existing light…or add strobe to create your own light.

In this case I was photographing my son on a classic route in Tensleep Wyoming, The Gravy Train. The route ascends the backside arete of a large pinnacle, which is in deep shade in the midday sun. But in the background are bright sunny cliffs creating the perfect silhouette. Sometimes contrast and midday sun work perfect for the shot.

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Creative church images

July 26th, 2015

Provence, France.
If you ever photograph while traveling, chances are good you will visit a church or other place of worship during your trip. Some churches are massive and ornate, others are simple and quaint. You probably shoot a few exterior shots, some of the detailed stonework or statues, and maybe a cross on top. Next you move to the interior (if photography is permitted inside). Dial up your ISO and photograph the paintings, stained glass windows and burning candles. These subjects are all great to photograph, and will be a meaningful part of your travel portfolio.

But what about creative church photography? What if you want to go beyond recording the subject, and want to do something more abstract. Next time try using multiple exposure twists. No, that is not a technical term, but it does describe what I often do photographing churches. I’ll set my multiple exposure to 4-7 frames, and rotate my camera after each shot. The end result is a kaleidoscope of colors and shapes.

szcan
Here is your standard candle shot in a church; nice image, has some emotion and warmth associated with it. But what else can I do?

szcand3
Here is a multiple exposure candle shot. Not there is a sea of candles with strong graphic elements. At the top of this post is stained glass windows shot using this technique. Next time you are in a church, try out this technique for some unique images.

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Camera angle is what makes the shot.

July 19th, 2015

horse3
I just returned from a fantastic workshop with ANPW in Provence, France. One of the most exciting days involved traveling to the Camargue area of southern France to photograph the famous white horses of this region. These horses love the water so we arranged a shoot with a local ranch to photograph the horses running through some deep marsh water. And lucky for us, we had a terrific shooting platform; an old military truck with high clearance to travel through the marshlands.

I’ve said this many times on workshops, and this shoot proved it to be true again; the background can make or break an image. If we had been photographing at ground level there would be only a few of the horses visible from side angles. But perched high off the ground in the truck, we had a terrific angle to show all the horses galloping across the marsh, not just a couple. Also, the high angle eliminated the white clouds on the horizon seen at ground level. Instead, the frame was filled with marsh and galloping white horses, no distracting background white spots in this frame. Sometimes the ground level is the place to shoot, other times not. But just remember, check your background as often as you check your subject for good compositions.

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Self Timer options

July 8th, 2015

zzip
I have been shooting the D810 for awhile now, and the camera continues to impress me. Incredible file quality, group-area autofocus, faster autofocus, faster frame rate…the list is long. But one feature this camera has, and other recent Nikon bodies as well, is multiple choices for self-timer shooting. What might these be? I go to my Custom Setting Menu, choose Timers/AE Lock, and then select Self-timer. You get three choices. First, you set the self-timer delay, something most photographers are familiar with for giving you enough time to jump back into those group shots. Second, you can choose the number of shots. Now this is really handy. For that same group shot, you could set your camera to take three images instead of one; someone is always looking the wrong way during that group shot. And third, you can choose the delay between shots. This is also very handy if you want to change positions during that group shot, or give time for everybody to smile.

I just found another great use for all these functions. I love to take POV, or point-of-view, images for a lot of my sports photography. Last week I was hired to photograph a zipline, and I really wanted to show the viewer what it looked like hiking along in the trees. I attached my fisheye lens to my D810, put the camera around my neck using the camera strap, and then twisted the strap to raise the camera position on my body. To maximize the number of shots I got while walking with the camera shooting, I set my self-timer for three frames at half second intervals. I hit the shutter, and the camera starting taking images as I walked across the zipline bridge. Very cool!

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On-camera fill flash

July 4th, 2015

veget
Happy Fourth of July to everyone! I just returned from an assignment in Alaska, always one of my favorite places. One day I visited a local market photographing various vendors and interesting people, and used one of the staple TTL flash techniques, on-camera fill flash. If you are photographing a parade this weekend, or a festival, this might be a technique you want to consider. Often the difference between a nice image and a really good image is a simple technique like fill flash.

I met a very friendly woman selling vegetables at the market, and her friendly personality and bright colors made a terrific photograph. With fill flash shooting your lighting ratio between background ambient light and flash is almost the same; most people won’t even know you used flash. But that is the point, you add a little flash to make the image ‘pop’, and your shot will look better than a standard available light image. Take a look at the image above. By adding just a touch of flash, the color of the vegetables has improved, and woman’s skin tones are more luminous with less shadows. Most importantly, she has catch lights in her eyes which makes the image more engaging.

I used a D810 with a SB900 attached to the hotshot for this shot. I placed a diffusion dome (which comes with the flash) on the flash to take the hard edge off the light. I was shooting in Aperture Priority using matrix metering, and just took the shot. No exposure or flash compensation. Flash was set to fill flash mode. It took about one minute to take this image, quick and easy. The beauty of modern speed light photography is you can shoot a fill flash shot like this in a few seconds, and the be on your way. Let the camera/flash figure things out. And you subject can go back to selling their wares without a big distraction.

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Roadtrip!

June 21st, 2015

Lander Wyoming. rock climbing
Just back from three weeks on the road, 3500 miles and 6 states. The primary purpose of this trip was to spend some time with my family climbing and camping…along with some climbing photo shoots! Living out of a trailer for three weeks with lots of photo equipment presents a few challenges, mainly keeping gear clean and batteries charged. We have large solar panels we use with our trailer, and since we had tons of sun, keeping Elinchrom flash packs charged wasn’t a problem.

Lander Wyoming. rock climbingLander Wyoming. rock climbing
My favorite shoot of the trip was in Moss Cave in Sinks Canyon, Wyoming. My son, Skyler, was working on a very difficult route (5.13c) that climbed out the severely overhung cave. As climbing photography goes, generally the best angle is from above the climber. My son attached a rope so I could ascend to get into the right position.

Lander Wyoming. rock climbingLander Wyoming. rock climbing
Next up was figuring out the lighting. Since the day was sunny, we had extreme contrast. I decided to us one of my favorite lighting techniques for climbing, what I call the ‘vertical studio’. My favorite light for this is the Elinchrom ELB400 and Quadra Hybrid. I attached one of these 400 watt packs to a 24 foot lightstand and extended it above where the climber would be. I attached a 27.5″ Rotalux Deep Octabank to soften the light, but removed the front diffusion to keep a little edge to the light, similar to beauty dish flash. The light filled in shadows on the climber, and produced a nice ‘pop’ to the image. Love hanging from ropes and shooting climbing pics!

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Stormy Skies and Lightning Triggers

June 7th, 2015

citysm
I just returned from a great trip to Ohio with the Mentor Series. We packed in the shooting from landscapes to portraits to sports, but one of the highlights for me was the incredible skyline images we created. We had scouted a good bridge to photograph the Columbus skyline, and we were hoping for a nice twilight image. But what we found was much more than your normal skyline shot. When we arrived an incredible thunderstorm was moving through the area, creating a spectacular sky above the city lights. The timing was perfect since both twilight and the city lights helped illuminate the moody storm clouds. After about five minutes of shooting, a downpour began and we retreated to our bus. To add even more drama and mood to this shot, I used the adjustment brush in Lightroom and added Clarity, Saturation and changed the white balance slightly. I also added a slight Topaz Adjust action to the final image.

We had lighting during this storm, but unfortunately no clean bolts, just cloud to cloud. But summer is the time to thrown your lighting trigger into your photo bag, you never know when you will be in the right place for a good lightning storm. I use the AOE Lightning Strike as my trigger; small and easy to use.

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